Carolyn Shapiro

Carolyn Shapiro

We live in a world in which it seems impossible to look upon landscape in the same way that we used to. These days, what we find is a landscape marked by hybridization, fragmentation and imprecision. The dispersed landscapes known as urban sprawl are the result of a number of factors: the rapid expansion in tertiary industries and tourism; the technological revolution; the boom in real estate and even the effects of a certain crisis in public space (Nogué 2009: 120). Our society is defined by movement, intermixing, globalism and speed. Thus, we have landscapes that are ever changing, discontinuous, artificial, cloned and repeated everywhere. It seems, therefore, that it no longer makes sense to speak of the purity of landscapes and that a certain amount of tact is now required when associating a landscape with a narrative of identity in which the individual and society are rooted.

Judith Stewart

Judith Stewart

We live in a world in which it seems impossible to look upon landscape in the same way that we used to. These days, what we find is a landscape marked by hybridization, fragmentation and imprecision. The dispersed landscapes known as urban sprawl are the result of a number of factors: the rapid expansion in tertiary industries and tourism; the technological revolution; the boom in real estate and even the effects of a certain crisis in public space (Nogué 2009: 120). Our society is defined by movement, intermixing, globalism and speed. Thus, we have landscapes that are ever changing, discontinuous, artificial, cloned and repeated everywhere. It seems, therefore, that it no longer makes sense to speak of the purity of landscapes and that a certain amount of tact is now required when associating a landscape with a narrative of identity in which the individual and society are rooted.

Laura C. Mayer

Laura C. Mayer

An exploration of how the language of taste weaved its way through the design revolutions of the eighteenth-century English garden, restructuring social hierarchies and re-writing the landscape.

Tom Baskeyfield & Mario Popham

Tom Baskeyfield & Mario Popham

haped by Stone is a project devised for the Barnaby Festival, a cultural festival in Macclesfield, Cheshire. For the past few years the festival’s programme has been curated around a theme, this year’s theme was ‘Space’.

Interpreting the theme through our shared interest in the interconnection of people, place, nature and landscape, Shaped by Stone took the relationship of an abandoned hillside quarry called Tegg’s Nose (now a country park) and the evidence of its stone in the footpaths, walls and roads of Macclesfield Town Centre.

Marlene Creates

Marlene Creates

From the Ground Tier to a Sparrow Batch: A Newfoundland Treasury of Terms for Ice and Snow, Blast Hole Pond River, Winter 2012-2013 is a documentary video-poem that is 26 minutes long. It’s based on observing the phenomena of winter by means of over 50 terms in the Newfoundland dialect for ice, snow, and winter weather.